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Аметист
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strizhi28 wrote in 9keys
Прекрасная статья о восхитительных аметистах на английском языке

A IS FOR AMETHYST – FEBRUARY’S BIRTHSTONE




A long-favored gemstone from as far back as the ancient Egyptians, the amethyst continues to endure as the go-to purple gemstone.  For centuries, people have believed this mystical stone possesses healing power:  the Greeks believed it to prevent intoxication while Europeans wore their amethyst amulets for protection and to keep them cool-headed.  Even the word “amethyst” derives from the Greek word “amethystos,” which translates to “not drunken.”

“According to a 16th century French poem, Dionysus, the god of intoxication, of wine, and grapes was pursuing a maiden named Amethystos, who refused his affections. Amethystos prayed to the gods to remain chaste, a prayer which the goddess Artemis answered, transforming her into a white stone. Humbled by Amethystos’s desire to remain chaste, Dionysus poured wine over the stone as an offering, dyeing the crystals purple.” (source)

As one of the 12 stones to adorn the breastplate of the high priests of Yahweh listed in the Bible, amethyst was thought to encourage piety and symbolize piety, making it an important and favorite stone for ecclesiastical ornaments of the Catholic church during the Middle Ages.  It was so often used in Episcopal rings that the amethyst earned the moniker “the Bishop’s Stone.”

18K yellow gold and amethyst, Victorian bishop’s ring. Hidden inner ring, made of silver, reveals a stalking golden wolf.

18K yellow gold and amethyst, Victorian bishop’s ring. Hidden inner ring, made of silver, reveals a stalking golden wolf.

What makes the amethyst particularly fitting as February’s birthstone is its close association with Saint Valentine, who is said to have always worn it.

“Up until the 18th century, amethyst was included in the cardinal, or most valuable, gemstones (along with diamond, sapphire, ruby, and emerald). However, since the discovery of extensive deposits in locations such as Brazil, it has lost most of its value.

Collectors look for depth of color, possibly with red flashes if cut conventionally.

The highest grade amethyst (called “Deep Russian”) is exceptionally rare and therefore, when one is found, its value is dependent on the demand of collectors. It is, however, still orders of magnitude lower than the highest grade sapphires or rubies (padparadscha sapphire or “pigeon’s blood” ruby).” (source)

An Impressive Antique Siberian Amethyst and Demantoid Garnet Rose Gold Pendant Necklace made in Moscow between 1908 and 1917 Three deep velvet purple Siberian amethysts, sixteen Ural demantoids, 56 zolotnik rose and yellow gold (14K-583)  The biggest amethyst is approximately 35 ct. ( 20.7 x 17.9 mm)

An Impressive Antique Siberian Amethyst and Demantoid Garnet Rose Gold Pendant Necklace
made in Moscow between 1908 and 1917
Three deep velvet purple Siberian amethysts, sixteen Ural demantoids, 56 zolotnik rose and yellow gold
The biggest amethyst is approximately 35 ct. ( 20.7 x 17.9 mm)

Amethyst occurs in transparent gem grades, as well as in more translucent material, which is used for carvings and beads. Found in great abundance in Brazil and Uruguay, other sources of the stone include South Korea, Russia, Zambia, and the United States. Interestingly, Maissau, Lower Austria is host to the largest opencast amethyst vein in the world.

“The color of amethyst ranges from a very light lilac to overly dark material. Prices generally are lower for very light or very dark material. The lighter material is often described as “Rose de France.” Amethyst may have a strong secondary red or blue color component. Deep colored material with either red or blue flashes is sometimes referred to as “Siberian Amethyst.” This generally is a color description, and does not imply that the material is actually from Siberia, although some of the Russian material does exhibit this desirable color.” (source)

Photo courtesy of Antero Jewelers

Photo courtesy of Antero Jewelers

Whether cherished for its mystical powers or for its glowing purple hues, the amethyst remains a popular stone in jewelry.  For today’s post, I will highlight some of the more important and finest jewelry featuring amethysts, some of which are currently available on the market.

Note:  Images are back-linked to original source; so, if you’re interested in one of the items available for purchase, just click on the photo!

Draperie necklace, Cartier Paris, 1947. Twisted gold, platinum, briliant and baguette-sized diamonds, a heart-shaped amethyst, 27 emerlad-sized amethysts and one facetted oval-shaped and turquoise cabochons. Designed and made to an order from the Duke of Windsor, who provided all gemstones apart from the turquoise. N.Welsh, Collection Cartier © Cartier. - Photo c/o French Vogue

Draperie necklace, Cartier Paris, 1947. Twisted gold, platinum, briliant and baguette-sized diamonds, a heart-shaped amethyst, 27 emerlad-sized amethysts and one facetted oval-shaped and turquoise cabochons. Designed and made to an order from the Duke of Windsor, who provided all gemstones apart from the turquoise. N.Welsh, Collection Cartier © Cartier. – Photo c/o French Vogue

SUZANNE BELPERRON 'Grape' Brooch - 1stdibs via FD

SUZANNE BELPERRON ‘Grape’ Brooch – available on 1stdibs via FD Gallery
Suzanne Belperron ‘Grape’ brooch in amethyst and gold. Yellow gold mounting set with 15 oval amethysts in various shades and sizes, partially effaced marker’s mark for Societe Groene et Darde and the Parisian assay mark for gold. Measuring approximately 6.2cm wide by 9.3cm long, manufactured in Paris by the company B.Herz, circa 1936.

Hemmerle earrings in white gold, copper, amethyst and purple sapphire - photo c/o Hemmerle

Hemmerle earrings in white gold, copper, amethyst and purple sapphire – photo c/o Hemmerle

18 KARAT GOLD, DIAMOND AND AMETHYST 'BOTTICELLI' NECKLACE, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS - Sold at Sotheby's New York in October 2009 for $194,500 USD

18 KARAT GOLD, DIAMOND AND AMETHYST ‘BOTTICELLI’ NECKLACE, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS – Sold at Sotheby’s New York in October 2009 for $194,500 USD

Verdura 'Candy' Amethyst Ring with Turquoise - available at Betteridge

Verdura ‘Candy’ Amethyst Ring with Turquoise – available at Betteridge

AN IMPRESSIVE AMETHYST, DIAMOND AND TURQUOISE NECKLACE, BY CARTIER - Sold at Christie's New York in October 2008 for $110,500 USD

AN IMPRESSIVE AMETHYST, DIAMOND AND TURQUOISE NECKLACE, BY CARTIER – Sold at Christie’s New York in October 2008 for $110,500 USD

Cartier Diamond, Ruby & Amethyst 'Orchid' Earrings - Sold at Betteridge

Cartier Diamond, Ruby & Amethyst ‘Orchid’ Earrings – Sold at Betteridge



http://www.jewelsdujour.com/2013/02/a-is-for-amethyst-februarys-birthstone/

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